Where Does Mold Grow?

Mold detection can almost seem so daunting and futile of a task when you realize that it’s possible for mold spores can reside on almost any surface in your house. So, where do you start to look for mold? It’s scary enough to have your phone or computer at the ready, so you can get in touch with a mold inspector to come and have a look, or you can order a home testing kit.

However, wouldn’t it feel better if you had an idea of where to start looking, so that you can narrow down the possibilities? Of course you can’t know where to look for mold until you know a little about why mold grows at all. That realization, in particular, is the key starting point, and leads to a key distinction that must be made. Indeed, while mold spores can be deposited on almost any surface in the home, it doesn’t necessarily follow that these spores will actually grow into mold contamination. These spores need the proper conditions – including temperature, nutrients, and level of moisture, in order to germinate. Otherwise, while the spores themselves might be on nearly every surface, they will probably remain dormant and wouldn’t cause a problem until they all became airborne at one time. In short, the real problem begins when the conditions are just right for mold to grow on those surfaces; they will germinate and become that same toxic mold that everyone’s concerned about.

If there is just the right temperature (which, by the way, the temperature range for mold growth is between 60 and 80 degrees Fahrenheit, which is the temperature that people prefer their rooms to be) nutrients, and moisture content on that surface to cause germination conditions, following where the moisture is may be the easiest and most telling of the conditions need needed to find the problem. This is why the first place to look is where the at those locations where a significant water event has occurred, such as a leaky pipe or the entry point of a recent flood.

Keep in a mind that a moisture event can occur in less drastic ways as well. If the air in your house is relatively warm but it comes in contact with a very cold surface water will vapor will condense on those surfaces, and it could certainly provide enough moisture to cause the mold spores on that surface to germinate.

So, in addition to finding likely sources of moisture events, its important to also look in places that provide nutrients needed for mold to grow. These nutrients can be found all around the house and can include paint, wall paper glue, wood, dust, cloth, and textiles. So where can you start looking for mold? The answer: anywhere in your house where there may be (or may have been) a significant amount of moisture, as well as those areas that might have carpeting paper, wall-paper, upholstery, wood, clothing, books, duct-work, ceiling and floor tiles, wallboard, rags leather, or anything else that can provide the nutrients for the mold to flourish combined with warm and humid conditions in the air.

Related posts:

  1. How Do I Know if I Have Mold in the House Mold in the home is not always easy to detect,...
  2. What is Mold? What is Mold? Mold (or mildew) are naturally occurring living...
  3. Two Methods for Mold Testing There are two basic ways to test for mold, once...
  4. How To Test For Mold While a certain amount of mold will make its way...
  5. Detecting Mold and How to Tell You Have Trouble With Mold How to Find Mold in Your Home? Detecting Household Mold...

pet roaming test kit PetThreats Mold Test Kit * Test 8 Pet Roaming Spots * Help your sick cat or dog * Swabs for Two Surfaces * Only $49.95! more information mold testing air surface detection mold detection store test kit


Comments are closed.